RapL

Learning Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Affective

Learning domain that involves receiving, responding, valuing and organizing morals and attitude.

B

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Remember • Understand • Apply • Analyze • Evaluate • Create

C

Contextual Inquiry

Following your learners in their environment, to better understand the context that could help them learn better. Additionally, shadowing them in the job provides you with good scenarios for training content later.

Cognitivism

One of the three components of the learning domain that includes all elements such as thinking, memory, problem solving, analytics, etc powered by an individual's mind.

Competencies

Attributes that are measurable and observable in nature and can effectively predict an individual's performance in a particular job / role.

D

Declarative Memory

Declarative memory is mostly the stuff you know, and can explicitly state, like facts, principles, or ideas.

Didactics

A composite set of activities and processes used to impart skills for doing a specific job

Design thinking

Design thinking is a problem-solving methodology that focuses heavily on involving the users of a solution in its design.

F

Formal Learning

A well defined and structured course delivered via trained individuals in a systematic and highly intentional way.

G

Gilbert Behavior Engineering Model

The Gilbert Behavior Engineering Model, created by Thomas Gilbert, classifies performance problems into one of six categories: information, resources, incentives, knowledge, capacity and motivation.

H

Habituation

Habituation means getting used to a sensory stimulus, to the point where we no longer notice or respond to it.

Humanism

An approach that emphasizes and gives importance to the human realm.

K

Kinesthetic learning

A sensory extension of "on the job" learning. A kinesthetic learning experience means an application of multiple senses to practice learning a skill. For example, a child learns to ride a bike.

L

Learning Experience

Learning experiences are like journeys. The journey starts where the learner is now, and ends when the learner is successful (however that is defined). A key mantra to a successful learning journey is that the end of the journey isn’t just knowing more, it’s doing more.

Learning styles

A notion that groups of individuals have different learning styles. There are many schools of thought around learning styles, some of the more prominent ones being Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences, VAK or VARK, and Kolb’s Learning Styles Inventory.

Learner Motivation

A learner's enthusiasm to learn a new skill or sharpen an existing skill. You can't control a learner's motivation, but there are ways to help support motivation in a learning design.

M

Microlearning

A training concept that can be applied in various stages in the professional development of employees. Micro-learning means teaching a small group of peers for a relatively short period of 5 to 15 minutes, and then giving and taking feedback on the performances.

O

Observational learning

A learning technique that attempts to draw insights through association and observation.

P

Performance Analysis

Performance analysis (PA) is partnering with clients and customers to help them define and achieve their goals. PA involves reaching out for several perspectives on a problem or opportunity; determining any and all drivers toward or barriers to successful performance; and proposing a solution system based on what is learned, not on what is typically done.

Pscychomotor

A component of the learning domain that links between physical activities, motor skills and mental processing.

Piaget's theory of cognitive development

A comprehensive theory about the development of human intelligence across various stages of their life, starting from birth. Sensorimotor (birth to 2 years) Preoperational (2 to 7 years) Concrete Operational (7 to 11 years) Formal operational (11 years through adulthood)

R

Roleplay

Learning vehicles in which representative actors enact a business scenario, and the solutions are offered as an act. They fit best in work scenarios where frequent human interactions happen, e.g., customer service training at a 24/7 convenience store.

S

Situational leadership

A leadership style in which the leader adjusts and adapts based on the environment that best suits the situation. Some common traits are direction, flexibility, encouraging participation, delegating responsibilities, regular coaching of team members and being honest.

Skill

The mental and physical ability of individuals to carry out a specific task to deliver results.

Spatial intelligence

Spatial intelligence is deftness to understand, interpret and absorb the fine details of a visual space. It's the acute awareness of how could a space change if various forces were applied to it.

System of records

A data management terminology used for information storage and retrieval. It often is the backbone for specific business processes.